Lessons how to draw Disney comics

comics, books

Postby Daniel73 » Sun Jan 23, 2011 3:27 pm

Here's a link to a webpage that contains an illustrated explanation of how to draw comics:

Comic Strip Artist's Kit
http://www.scribd.com/doc/5119/Comic-Strip-Artists-Kit

Harry Fluks on Disney Comics Mailing List, 20 January 2011:
This artwork has been known since the 1980s. It was also used (partly) in
Disney comics in Holland. The sketches were done by Carson Van Osten.

Van Osten's comments:
It started as a slide presentation for my boss to show at the Disney meeting
in Frankfurt. It went over so well that he asked me to expand on it when he
returned. They printed 2000 copies and mailed it to all the Disney offices.
My friend John Pomeroy asked for some to give to the animators at the
studio. that was the time when the animation training program was going on.
Frank Thomas saw it and used it for an animation class he was teaching at
the Screen Cartoonists Guild. That's how some sketches wound up in the book
that he and Ollie wrote, "the Illusion of Life".

See also https://coa.inducks.org/story.php?c=SCM++1

Direct links and identification of the pages:

page 1 - Common problems that occur in comic panel design
http://htmlimg3.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/1-7659700268/000.jpg

page 2 - Solution
http://htmlimg2.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/2-52400fec92/000.jpg

page 3 - This is what's called a "wooden" character
http://htmlimg4.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/3-3629754efb/000.jpg

page 4 - Tips and tricks
http://htmlimg1.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/4-9302085f44/000.jpg

page 5 - Thumbnail sketches
http://htmlimg4.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/5-6497220cdf/000.jpg

page 6 - Staging
http://htmlimg3.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/6-f1f767e3c9/000.jpg

page 7 - Staging (perspective)
http://htmlimg4.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/7-9e1de8d665/000.jpg

Thanks to August Yang for the tip (sent to DCML).
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Postby Robb_K » Sun Jan 23, 2011 7:03 pm

Daniel73 wrote:Here's a link to a webpage that contains an illustrated explanation of how to draw comics:

Comic Strip Artist's Kit
http://www.scribd.com/doc/5119/Comic-Strip-Artists-Kit

Harry Fluks on Disney Comics Mailing List, 20 January 2011:
This artwork has been known since the 1980s. It was also used (partly) in
Disney comics in Holland. The sketches were done by Carson Van Osten.

Van Osten's comments:
It started as a slide presentation for my boss to show at the Disney meeting
in Frankfurt. It went over so well that he asked me to expand on it when he
returned. They printed 2000 copies and mailed it to all the Disney offices.
My friend John Pomeroy asked for some to give to the animators at the
studio. that was the time when the animation training program was going on.
Frank Thomas saw it and used it for an animation class he was teaching at
the Screen Cartoonists Guild. That's how some sketches wound up in the book
that he and Ollie wrote, "the Illusion of Life".

See also https://coa.inducks.org/story.php?c=SCM++1

Direct links and identification of the pages:

page 1 - Common problems that occur in comic panel design
http://htmlimg3.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/1-7659700268/000.jpg

page 2 - Solution
http://htmlimg2.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/2-52400fec92/000.jpg

page 3 - This is what's called a "wooden" character
http://htmlimg4.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/3-3629754efb/000.jpg

page 4 - Tips and tricks
http://htmlimg1.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/4-9302085f44/000.jpg

page 5 - Thumbnail sketches
http://htmlimg4.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/5-6497220cdf/000.jpg

page 6 - Staging
http://htmlimg3.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/6-f1f767e3c9/000.jpg

page 7 - Staging (perspective)
http://htmlimg4.scribdassets.com/3yo4c47ixvubk/images/7-9e1de8d665/000.jpg

Thanks to August Yang for the tip (sent to DCML).

In the early 1980s I took a comic book storyboarding course in Los Angeles that referred to that Disney "storyboarding workbook".
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Postby Robb_K » Sun Jan 23, 2011 7:07 pm

We were shown that very same booklet in a storyboarding course I took at The Cartoonist Union School (American Animation Institute("Screen Cartoonists' Guild"-mentioned above), in the1990s.
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Postby McDuck Menu » Sun Jan 23, 2011 11:46 pm

Very useful tips in there! I'll have to rethink some of the panels in my own Duck comic/scenario.
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Postby Robb_K » Mon Jan 24, 2011 9:31 am

There are lots of different things to consider in staging a story, including a mix of close and long shots to avoid monotony, moving the story along to the next page, the aesthetic mix of what is on one page next to another, directing the reader's eye towards what is important in a panel, and many other concerns of the story teller. It is much more complicated than a layman can imagine. A good technical artist is not automatically a good comic book story artist.
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Postby McDuck Menu » Mon Jan 24, 2011 7:20 pm

Robb_K wrote:There are lots of different things to consider in staging a story, including a mix of close and long shots to avoid monotony, moving the story along to the next page, the aesthetic mix of what is on one page next to another, directing the reader's eye towards what is important in a panel, and many other concerns of the story teller. It is much more complicated than a layman can imagine. A good technical artist is not automatically a good comic book story artist.

Well, I've found out about that recently. I'm currently writing a story about the nephews bringing home a very energetic hamster, while Donald is struggling to think up a useful invention. He wants to win a grand prize at the Duckburg Invention Fair/Exhibition, but he's distracted by the rattling of the hamster's running wheel. He then tries to find ways to reduce the noise coming from the wheel, but of course they backfire.

It's sort of an experiment for myself, to see if I've got what it takes to write material. The thing is I keep adjusting every panel, as to make it as easy to read as possible. Also I like to play around with the camera angle, to keep things interesting for the reader (and myself). Because of this adjusting, I'm not progressing very fast. The aestethic mix of what is on one page and what is on another is something I've completely forgot to implement, so I'd have to take a look at that too.
Another thing I've found hard to accomplish is making little cliffhangers at the end of the pages, or at least making it interesting to turn the page, not even mentioning the flow of the story. I like the process of writing however, because you get to think very deeply about the progress of a story, and how it conveys to the public.
I think I'm on the right track, but I'm not completely sure. Would be nice though to learn some basics, because at the moment I'm just using the concept of trial and error.
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Postby Robb_K » Wed Jan 26, 2011 4:21 am

McDuck Menu wrote:
Robb_K wrote:There are lots of different things to consider in staging a story, including a mix of close and long shots to avoid monotony, moving the story along to the next page, the aesthetic mix of what is on one page next to another, directing the reader's eye towards what is important in a panel, and many other concerns of the story teller. It is much more complicated than a layman can imagine. A good technical artist is not automatically a good comic book story artist.

Well, I've found out about that recently. I'm currently writing a story about the nephews bringing home a very energetic hamster, while Donald is struggling to think up a useful invention. He wants to win a grand prize at the Duckburg Invention Fair/Exhibition, but he's distracted by the rattling of the hamster's running wheel. He then tries to find ways to reduce the noise coming from the wheel, but of course they backfire.

It's sort of an experiment for myself, to see if I've got what it takes to write material. The thing is I keep adjusting every panel, as to make it as easy to read as possible. Also I like to play around with the camera angle, to keep things interesting for the reader (and myself). Because of this adjusting, I'm not progressing very fast. The aestethic mix of what is on one page and what is on another is something I've completely forgot to implement, so I'd have to take a look at that too.
Another thing I've found hard to accomplish is making little cliffhangers at the end of the pages, or at least making it interesting to turn the page, not even mentioning the flow of the story. I like the process of writing however, because you get to think very deeply about the progress of a story, and how it conveys to the public.
I think I'm on the right track, but I'm not completely sure. Would be nice though to learn some basics, because at the moment I'm just using the concept of trial and error.

I'd be glad to give you feedback on yours (especially if you give me feedback on mine). E-mail me the next group of your scribbles on that story, and I'll send you mine on the story I'm working on now. The more feedback, the better.
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Postby McDuck Menu » Wed Jan 26, 2011 4:43 pm

I'll send them as soon as I can :) I reckon you have my email adress? I have yours, so you'll have mine when I send my story anyway. Off to scketch and scribble ;)
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Postby David Kopsky » Wed Jan 26, 2011 6:52 pm

McDuck Menu wrote:I'll send them as soon as I can :) I reckon you have my email adress? I have yours, so you'll have mine when I send my story anyway. Off to scketch and scribble ;)

Zullen wij behalve dat Dropboxje ook wat feedback uitwisselen? Zoals Rob al zei, hoe meer feedback hoe beter!
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Postby McDuck Menu » Wed Jan 26, 2011 11:25 pm

I'll give feedback as soon as I've completed my story, if that's okay with you. Just one more page to go :) I'll place it in the dropbox.
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