Best Murry Serial?

Santiago Ceballos, William Van Horn, Paul Murry, Don Rosa, etc.

Postby WB » Fri May 19, 2006 9:42 pm

Thinking about previous topics, I don't want to be labeled as a wanton Paul Murry basher because there are some good Carl Fallberg/Paul Murry serials that buck the general stuff that many often dislike. So this thread is basically a more positive attempt at deciding what you think the best Paul Murry/Carl Fallberg Mickey Mouse serial is. :) I'll wait to see what others think before I post my opinions.
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Postby Rockerduck » Fri May 19, 2006 10:35 pm

What exactly do you mean with 'serial'? Disney-stories are in general one-shots (although nowadays more and more Egmnt stories are serials).
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Postby WB » Sat May 20, 2006 8:05 am

Thats what we in the states called the multipart Mickey stories that used to print in the back of WDC&S. Namely because they were "serialized" in 3 to 4 parts in the back of the book.
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Postby Robb_K » Sat May 20, 2006 11:09 am

I like a lot of Fallberg's stories. "Phantom Fires", "The Idol Of Moaning Island", "Yesterday Ranch", "The Fantastic Fog", "The Last Resort" "The Sunken City", the list could go on and on. Had Gottfredson drawn them, (instead of his day-to-day pages from 1955-1975) there would be that many more greatly drawn stories to enjoy all the more!
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Postby germund » Fri Jun 02, 2006 3:32 pm

Selecting favourites from Murry's vast production (65 "true" Mickey serials if I remember correctly) is quite difficult but, as Rob wrote, The Idol of Moaning Island (WDC214-16) is a favourite, and especially the night and sand storm scenes on the tropical island. Also the Pineapple Poachers (WDC234-36) with the menehunes and all the falling rain is great. Another great scene is featured in Alaskan Adventure (WDC223-25) where Mickey and Goofy are captured by indians and walking through fog and stem into the hidden valley. For nostalgic reasons I also have to mention the fur trader story The River Pirates (WDC336-338) and The Strange Case of Professor Zero (WDC 339-341) which to me represent the very best of the late 60s time travel/science fiction scripts in the US Disney comic books. The River Pirates appear to be one of the few late Fallberg scripts though, so its high standard may not be too surprising.

Contrary to many others here (apparently) I am endlessly fascinated with Murry's artwork. I consider Gottfredson and Scarpa far more dynamic Mickey Mouse artists, but Murry had polished feel and control of his ink lines that was practically unsurpassable. Murry's Goofy is, despite his often quite thick ink lines, the most distinct and well proportioned Goofy I know. True, Murry very often resorted to the "hand-in-front-of-mouth" pose but when he did handle Goofy's lanky body in awkward positions, the result was nearly always a delicate balance of humour and complex controlled movements. I agree that Murry's art grew stiffer and more repetitive over the years but until the early 1960s the man has my greatest respect.

I'm so happy to find a Disney comic forum in English by the way. Great initiative!
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Postby Robb_K » Fri Jun 02, 2006 8:15 pm

germund wrote:Selecting favourites from Murry's vast production (65 "true" Mickey serials if I remember correctly) is quite difficult but, as Rob wrote, The Idol of Moaning Island (WDC214-16) is a favourite, and especially the night and sand storm scenes on the tropical island. Also the Pineapple Poachers (WDC234-36) with the menehunes and all the falling rain is great. Another great scene is featured in Alaskan Adventure (WDC223-25) where Mickey and Goofy are captured by indians and walking through fog and stem into the hidden valley. For nostalgic reasons I also have to mention the fur trader story The River Pirates (WDC336-338) and The Strange Case of Professor Zero (WDC 339-341) which to me represent the very best of the late 60s time travel/science fiction scripts in the US Disney comic books. The River Pirates appear to be one of the few late Fallberg scripts though, so its high standard may not be too surprising.

Contrary to many others here (apparently) I am endlessly fascinated with Murry's artwork. I consider Gottfredson and Scarpa far more dynamic Mickey Mouse artists, but Murry had polished feel and control of his ink lines that was practically unsurpassable. Murry's Goofy is, despite his often quite thick ink lines, the most distinct and well proportioned Goofy I know. True, Murry very often resorted to the "hand-in-front-of-mouth" pose but when he did handle Goofy's lanky body in awkward positions, the result was nearly always a delicate balance of humour and complex controlled movements. I agree that Murry's art grew stiffer and more repetitive over the years but until the early 1960s the man has my greatest respect.

I'm so happy to find a Disney comic forum in English by the way. Great initiative!

Vaelkommen Germund! The more the merrier! We can open a topic on Tony Strobl (and all the lesser discussed Golden Age artists) and learn from each other. Tell your friends about this forum, too. We need more particpants.
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Postby Egg » Mon Oct 30, 2006 3:07 am

germund wrote:Contrary to many others here (apparently) I am endlessly fascinated with Murry's artwork.

I like Paul Murry's art very much. I think he's the best Mickey Mouse comic book artist, and that Floyd Gottfredson was the best newspaper artist.

germund wrote:True, Murry very often resorted to the "hand-in-front-of-mouth" pose but when he did handle Goofy's lanky body in awkward positions, the result was nearly always a delicate balance of humour and complex controlled movements. I agree that Murry's art grew stiffer and more repetitive over the years but until the early 1960s the man has my greatest respect.

I dislike the repetitive "hand-in-front-of-mouth" pose. Goofy laughing the same way, with a hand in front of his face.
This Goofy laugh was the subject of a story in which a double Goofy is unmasked because of laughing differently than the real Goofy. I remember this as a Murry-story. Does someone here know it?

Is Supergoofy also by Paul Murry? The series where Goofy, wearing some pyjamas-suit, is able to fly after eating some peanuts?
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Postby Zekenwolf » Sat Jan 06, 2007 3:06 pm

I grew up on Paul Murry's Mickey Mouse like most people outside Europe & North America. I always liked his 'everyman' version of the Mouse, which was a nice contrast to the likes of Donald Duck & Uncle $crooge in the WDC&S comics. The serial that I liked best was the very unsual story "The Strange Case of Professor Zero" in WDC&S 339-341.
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Postby Egg » Sun Jan 07, 2007 6:29 pm

Zekenwolf wrote:I grew up on Paul Murry's Mickey Mouse like most people outside Europe & North America. I always liked his 'everyman' version of the Mouse, which was a nice contrast to the likes of Donald Duck & Uncle $crooge in the WDC&S comics. The serial that I liked best was the very unsual story "The Strange Case of Professor Zero" in WDC&S 339-341.

Egg can't judge this Murry-story, as COA says it has never been published in The Netherlands:

The Strange Case of Professor Zero
http://coa.inducks.org/s.php/x/W+WDC+339-05
http://coa.inducks.org/s.php/x/W+WDC+340-05
http://coa.inducks.org/s.php/x/W+WDC+341-05

What is unusual about the story?
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Postby of ducks and mice » Fri Feb 15, 2008 5:22 pm

As a kid in the 60s and 70s, I loved WC&S, esp. the ones w/MM serials in the back. I lived in the rural south, however, and we didn't always get every issue, so I only collected one complete series. It used to kill me not knowing what happened in those other MM stories.

I liked Murry's work. For me, you couldn't get better than a Barks Donald story up front with Gyro Gearloose short and a MM serial in the back.

Does anyone have a list of the MM serials or better yet, link to the actual comics themselves?

Thanks.
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Postby Robb_K » Fri Mar 14, 2008 7:03 am

Egg wrote:
germund wrote:Contrary to many others here (apparently) I am endlessly fascinated with Murry's artwork.

I like Paul Murry's art very much. I think he's the best Mickey Mouse comic book artist, and that Floyd Gottfredson was the best newspaper artist.

germund wrote:True, Murry very often resorted to the "hand-in-front-of-mouth" pose but when he did handle Goofy's lanky body in awkward positions, the result was nearly always a delicate balance of humour and complex controlled movements. I agree that Murry's art grew stiffer and more repetitive over the years but until the early 1960s the man has my greatest respect.

I dislike the repetitive "hand-in-front-of-mouth" pose. Goofy laughing the same way, with a hand in front of his face.
This Goofy laugh was the subject of a story in which a double Goofy is unmasked because of laughing differently than the real Goofy. I remember this as a Murry-story. Does someone here know it?

Is Supergoofy also by Paul Murry? The series where Goofy, wearing some pyjamas-suit, is able to fly after eating some peanuts?

Yes, Murray drew the great bulk of Super Goof stories (if not all). In my opinion, his artwork was relatively poor during all of the '60s. I think the Mickey Mouse stories in that era were pretty poor as well. I only bought the US comics with new Barks stories during that era (and even those were only a distant shadow of his former work).
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